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Friday, February 11, 2011

Sanjeev Kapoor's Potato, Banana, and Pomegranate Chaat

I just came across a picture of a chaat I made a couple months ago and thought I'd share the recipe now. It's from Sanjeev Kapoor's first U.S.-published book, How to Cook Indian [Food], which I worked on a bit for STC in late summer. The book is well worth checking out when it's released in April—it's absolutely loaded with fun, authentic, but do-able dishes from all over India. I especially liked the chaats, of course.

Aloo Kachalu Chaat
Serves 4 to 6.

This is only slightly simplified from Sanjeev's version.

1 1/2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice
1/2 teaspoon salt, or more to taste
1 teaspoon tamarind concentrate
1 teaspoon chaat masala (see Note)
1 large ripe banana
2 potatoes, boiled, cooled, peeled, and cut into 1-inch pieces
1 sweet potato, boiled, cooled, peeled, and cut into 1-inch pieces
1 hot green chiles, minced
1/4 cup fresh pomegranate arils
Handful of fresh cilantro, chopped
1-inch piece fresh ginger, cut into thin julienne

In a large bowl, whisk together the lemon juice, salt, tamarind, and chaat masala. Add the banana, potatoes, sweet potato, chile, pomegranate, and cilantro and toss to coat. Taste and add more salt if necessary. Pile on a platter and scatter the ginger over the top. Serve at room temperature.

Note: The spice mix chaat masala can be purchased at Indian grocery stores, or you can mix up some of your own, or just sprinkle in a little coriander, cumin, and ground cayenne. Sanjeev's chaat masala: 1/4 cup coriander seeds, 2 teaspoons cumin seeds, 1 teaspoon ajwain, 2 or 3 dried red chiles, 3 tablespoons black salt (which I think is rather a lot), 1/2 teaspoon citric acid, 1 teaspoon amchur, 1 tablespoon regular salt, and 1 teaspoon ground black pepper—whole spices toasted and ground and then everything mixed together. Makes 1/2 cup.

28 comments:

Denise | Chez Danisse said...

This looks delicious. What do you usually serve it beside?

Liana Krissoff said...

Denise: If I remember correctly, I made this along with about six other dishes from the book (and it was way too much!). Chaat is usually just eaten as a snack, or a light lunch, but this one (which doesn't have the usual crisp-crunchy toppings) would probably be nice alongside some spicy pan-fried ground lamb and dal patties or simple grilled kebabs.

Denise | Chez Danisse said...

Thanks!

margie said...

My basic go-to dish is dal, and then I add other stuff depending on my time and interest. This looks good, though, with the spicy-sweet combination.

By the way, I wanted to tell you that I made the Navel Orange Marmalade from your book the other day (with a mixture of blood and Cara Cara oranges). I'm in heaven - I only wish I'd made more! I'll eventually get my pretty-in-pink version up on the blog :)

Liana Krissoff said...

Margie: I've made that marmalade with Cara Cara oranges, and it is beautiful! I'm sure with blood oranges it's even more so. I'm glad you like it!

Dani said...

I know that this isn't related to the recipe posted (which looks delicious), but I was wondering if I could use your Lemon Curd recipe on my blog? I just made it for the first time and would really like to post about it. I will be sure to link to the Amazon sales page for your book and your blog.

Thanks for your time,

Dani

Liana Krissoff said...

Dani: Of course—that's fine. I'm glad you liked it!

Molly said...

I only learned about chaat a few years ago, and even though it seemed like such a simple dish, I've always been a little worried to try it. This sounds so good!

Robyn said...

hello,
i dont know who else to ask about sauerkraut! Ive only made it once from your book and this time around i think something is wrong with it. There is a thin layer of white with bigger white spots in my big bucket of fermenting sauerkraut. i skim it off everyday but it seems to reappear everyday. last time this was not a issue so im really confused. Last time there was also hardly any scum. weird.

Liana Krissoff said...

Robyn: It sounds like mold on the sauerkraut, which can happen if there isn't enough salt in the brine or if the kraut got too warm (I think about 60–70 degrees is ideal). I'd throw that batch out and try again. As always, if something doesn't seem right, toss it.

Robyn said...

thanks so i threw it out... not sure what went wrong im from the bay area and it never gets hot or even warm. I also used more salt than was recomended because I used more cabbage then your recipe. Maybe I didnt let the brine cool enough before I put it in the ace bucket? maybe I should get a bucket that the sides are not as high? hmm...

askimmel said...

I just wanted to say that I am a huge fan of your cook book. I am so excited to start blogging about canning! Thanks for all your great recipes!

Cindy said...

Liana,

I'm sorry for leaving my question here, but I couldn't find another way to contact you.

Re: Strawberry preserve (pg 30 ). I made this on 3/27/11. The last two jars I opened had lost its gorgeous red color and the preserve was turning brown from top to bottom. I followed your recipe exactly, or as exactly as one can be when following a recipe. Any advise?

Cindy

Liana Krissoff said...

Cindy: One thing I didn't go into a lot of detail about in the book is storage. Canned goods should be kept in a cool, dark place. If they get too warm or in too much light they discolor more quickly than they otherwise would. That's especially true, I've found, for delicate fruits like strawberries, raspberries, and blueberries, and especially when the preserve is low in sugar. In ideal storage conditions, they will keep their color for 6 months or so and then very gradually start to fade/brown. But in any case, if the jars are sealed tight the fruit preserves are still perfectly fine to eat, and the flavor won't diminish at all (as far as I know, they'll stay delicious for years).

Liana Krissoff said...

I meant if they are _in_ too much light.

CindyR said...

Liana,

Thank you so much for your response.

The strawberry preserves are kept in a dark cupboard, but I live in Houston so when the a/c goes off for the night on the first floor, the cupboard could get as warm as 70F-80F.

It's good to know the discoloration is only cosmetic because I absolutely *adore* this recipe. The preserve is like strawberry flavour expressed to their fullest extent.

Thanks again!

Anonymous said...

Where do I find the 6% vinegar requested in the baby artichoke recipe on page 50 or 51 in your book? I really like the book and have used several recipes. Thanks

Anonymous said...

Ok, I finally got an answer from the Washington State Extension Service about 6% acidity. Rice wine vinegar is usually 6% check the label to make sure.

The artichokes are really good. Everyone wanted more for the cupboard. The baby artichokes have such a short season and are hard to find in the Northwest (Seattle).

Liana Krissoff said...

Anon: I was traveling last week and didn't get your query about the vinegars. I actually don't find many rice vinegars that are as high as 6% acidity, so definitely check the label. Wine vinegars, in my experience, are usually higher, 6 or 7%. In any case, always use a vinegar that's the percentage in the recipe or higher.

I'm glad you liked the artichokes! Somehow they seem easier to prep when you're doing a lot of them!

SarahAnd said...

Another question for you, since it appears you are generously providing terrific answers: I grew 2 pear tomato plants this year, and they are monsters. The first one just started turning yellow and I will very soon be in the midst of what you called a tomato emergency in your excellent book. Any ideas for pear tomatoes? I love to eat them like candy, but it would be great if I could preserve them. Have you ever frozen pear tomatoes? How about canned them? Help?! Thanks!

Liana Krissoff said...

Hi! I've never canned those, and I wonder if you'd lose some of their nice sweet character if you did. Just be sure to add the citric acid, as they are probably at the higher-pH end of the spectrum for tomatoes. Ooh, and I bet they'd be good in the tomato and basil jam!

SarahAnd said...

Yes, that is what I am afraid of, too. Actually, pear tomatoes are, I believe, slightly less acidic than some other varieties. I have not tried making tomato jam yet and am somewhat hesitant to do so. I guess I just don't know if I would like it or what to do with it! Probably I can try the jam, try preserving a few, and try freezing others and see what works best. There will be plenty! I have also read where some people tried pickling them, though I think your green pickled tomato recipe sounds much better. I'll do some experimenting and see what works. Thanks so much for your feedback and the tomato basil jam idea!

Staci at Life At Cobble Hill Farm said...

I just purchased your book and I cannot wait to try the recipes this summer. I'm having a hard time finding one that I don't want to try! :-)

Sherri B. said...

I wanted to let you know that I am having a giveaway on my blog and your lovely book "Canning for a New Generation" will be the prize. I found it on Amazon and loved the photos and your unique offerings. I'mm looking forward to giving it and I will be ordering a copy for myself as well.

I couldn't find an email address so I do hope you get this. xo

Liana Krissoff said...

Thank you, Sherri! That's very generous of you! I hope you get lots of entries!

Unknown said...

Hi Liana,
I'm going to be canning a some pickles and jams as favors for our wedding celebration. Can you tell me if the processing time changes if I use half pint jars instead of pint jars for the spicy pickled carrots and the dilly beans?
Thank you!
Meredith

Liana Krissoff said...

What a sweet idea for wedding favors! For half-pints of those pickles I'd process for the same amount of time as in the recipe just to be totally sure everything got heated up. You might, though, want to try a couple jars first; if the brine boils up and keeps the lids from sealing, reduce the time by a few minutes.

Shahids said...

Wow now that is delicious, potatoes are my kid's favorite, I will let you know their feedback on this recipe :)